As cars received more options and such, more circuits needed protecting and you only had "X" space to place the panel into, so you parcel the land out into smaller areas, hence ATO style fuses.

If you take out a fuse and look at the clips behind, they are pointing in every direction (not horizontal).

So when you push the fuse in, the clips are not in 100% contact with the "fuse blades", just a tiny scratch in some places.

I haven't called them yet as I wanted to check with you guys to see if someone had info to share. '66 Chevy Caprice 2DR HDTP 496/4L80e/3.73, 20's, Console, Buckets '06 Chevy 2500HD 4x4 LBZ Duramax/Allison '08 Toyota Highlander "Hybrid" '99 VW Jetta TDI Gerald Lafayette, La.

'66 Chevy Caprice 2DR HDTP 496/4L80e/3.73, 20's, Console, Buckets '06 Chevy 2500HD 4x4 LBZ Duramax/Allison '08 Toyota Highlander "Hybrid" '99 VW Jetta TDI In response to capricesport66 Hi, I bought the separate Painless fuse-center P/N30001, but i cant say im very pleased with the construction.

It must transfer the current without any big power drop through the fuse.

/Pete In response to Pete66 Pete, I see your examples on page 11 and 12.

He's very familiar with how electricity works in the field, AC/DC, single phase, 3-phase, generators, motor windings, etc. My dad is now in his 80's, eyesight is failing, and is really not in any condition to do any of this kind of work anymore.

Some time ago, he was contacted by his insurance agent (State Farm) with questions relating to his electrical service.

In that case i would not have a scratch in one corner of some fuse-blades.

The box at the bottom of page 11 looks a little better.

If you construct a -topp of the line harness- you dont want a "crap fusebox", that will ruin the whole setup.