Online publications invite us to “join the conversation,” which is usually more of a scream-fest. wonders if “debate has become too harsh for our delicate sensibilities. We are invited to “join the conversation if we want to give an opinion. Thanks for listening, eh.” – Debbie Irwin, Sault Ste. “A corporate-academic weasel word,” according to the Urban Dictionary.

university of minnesota mankato dating-18

” Answer: “So my dad was in a classical music club…” – Bob Forrest, Tempe Ariz. The word serves no purpose in the sentence and to me is like fingernails on a chalkboard. LSSU, please engage your stakeholders by adding this pretentious jargon to your list. Harley Carter of Calgary, Alberta, says he has heard it with another word popular in business-speak, “socialize,” which means to spread an idea around to see what others think of it.

So, I submit the extra, meaningless, and overused word ‘so.’” – Scott Shackleton, Sault Ste. “Politicians, especially, are using this word when asked a question and not answering said question. “Frequently used to begin a sentence, particularly in response to a question, this tiresome and grammatically incorrect replacement for “Like,” or “Um,” is even more irksome…It hurts my ears, every single time I hear it! “We need to socialize this concept with our ‘stakeholders.’” “Dr.

“(We’ve) lost sight of the metaphor and started to think it’s a real place, like with the headline, ‘Obama, Boehner meeting on fiscal cliff’.” Barry Cochran, Portland, Ore.

“Tends to be used however the speaker wishes to use it, as in falling off the fiscal cliff, climbing the fiscal cliff, challenged by the fiscal cliff, etc.

“I would definitely like to kick some cans of the human variety every time I hear politicians use this phrase to describe a circumstance that hasn’t gone their way.” Christine Tomassini, Livonia, Mich. “Over-used within the last year or so in politics.” John Gates, Cumberland, Maine “Better nip this in the bud – it’s already morphed into ‘quadruple down.'” Marc Ponto, Milwaukee, Wisc.

“Much the same as ‘put on the back burner,’ these two phrases still have heat and are still in the road. Raczko, Swanton, Ohio “I can’t turn on the TV any more without being informed that can-kicking has occurred. ” Kathryn, West Chester, Ohio “This blackjack term is now used as a verb in place of ‘repeat’ or ‘reaffirm’ or ‘reiterate.’ Yet, it adds nothing. “It implies supernatural powers — such as the ability to change the weather or levitate.

Nearly all who nominated it found a way to use it in their entries, so we wonder if they’re really willing to let go. “It’s #obnoxious #ridiculous #annoying and I wish it would disappear.” – Jen, Sault Ste. It received nearly as many nominations as “selfie” and “twerk” from coast to coast in the U. It is an insult to the millions of dads who are the primary caregivers for their children. Used by members of each political party when describing members of the other.

#goodluckwiththat “A technical term for a useful means of categorizing content in social media, the word is abused as an interjection in verbal conversation and advertising. A wandering prefix (see 2010’s “Obama-“) finally settles down.

– Beth, Anchorage, Alaska “I am not sure who is responsible, but over the last 12-18 months you cannot watch a sporting event, listen to a sports talk show on radio, or anything on ESPN without someone using this term to attempt to describe an athlete or a contest.” – Dan Beitzel, Perrysburg, Ohio “Every time I hear them say it, I change the channel.” – Brenda Ruffing, Jackson, Mich. News flash: We ALL like food.” – Graydeon De Camp, Elk Rapids, Mich. “It used to have a special significance reserved mainly for fine art and museums. Monthly food and clothing subscription boxes claim to be finely ‘curated.’ Instead of abusing curated, why don’t they say what they really mean: ‘We did an online search and posted the first 25 items we found’ or the ‘curated selection of items in your box this month are a mix of paid placements and products that have failed to sell elsewhere.'” – Samantha Mc Cormick, Kirkland, Wash. I’ve heard Charlie Rose use it, as well as countless numbers of news talking heads, usually for all the wrong reasons. Nobody cares about you.” — David, Lake Mills, Wisc. This common way of describing an automobile collision has now made it from conversation into the news reports.

“I’ve heard of cooks and chefs, and gourmets and gourmands, but what the heck is a ‘foodie’? “Example on the ‘Net today: ‘Get a curated box of high-end treats and toys (all tailored to the size of your pup) shipped right to your doggie door.’ – I have heard and read the word ‘curated’ far too many times this year.” – Deb, Portland, Ore. “It’s used all too frequently on news programs, as in, ‘What is your ‘takeaway’ on (a given situation.’ ‘What is our ‘takeaway’ on Congress’ vote? For me, a takeaway is a sports term, where one team is controlling the ball (or puck) and the other steals it, or took it away – a ‘takeaway.’ In the U. Dayna of Rochester Hills, Mich., laments how many people observe “Selfie Sunday” in social media, and Josh of Tucson, Ariz., asks, “Why can’t we have more selflessies? said, “All evidence of Miley Cyrus’ VMA performance must be deleted,” but it seems that many had just as much fun as Miley did on stage when they submitted their nominations. While the accident’s layout does, indeed, resemble its namesake cut of beef, we’d prefer to dispense with the collateral imagery and enjoy a great steak.

” “Because President Obama’s signature healthcare law is actually called the Affordable Care Act.