It bothers me when people complain about not having a significant other, but at the end of the day they’re doing absolutely to find someone.

When I burst my college bubble by moving to SF, I realized that everyone here is signed up for at least one dating app, and if they aren’t, it’s because they’ve been in a serious relationship for forever and are no longer in the market.

Back home, people weren’t nearly as turned on to the idea of online dating, but here, it’s completely the norm.

“A hookup can be a one-night stand or the beginning of seeing each other or the start of a committed romantic relationship.

It can also be anything from kissing to intercourse on the sexual spectrum.

Only 20 percent of the 200 students surveyed by campus jobs start-up Way Up said they used the app for casual sex, and less than a third said they were looking for a significant other. At least a few people are indeed looking for friends on Tinder, Paul said, which she knows because she’s met some of them, but they weren’t college students.

Two hundred students isn’t a very large pool -- the app is estimated to have 50 million subscribers -- and is this even a question students would answer honestly?

I decided to use Coffee Meets Bagel (CMB), and here are the observations that I made. Dating In College Is Pretty Terrible It’s really difficult to meet people organically because everyone is sewn to their phones and thinking of what their next move is going to be on Instagram or Snapchat.

Guys, at least at my school, are pretty rude as soon as the sun goes down.

My guess is that when college students use Tinder, they don't know exactly what they want -- or what they'll find.

So, they may say on surveys that they are open to many different possibilities, including just making some new friends (who they may or may not actually hook up with).” There also may be a stigma at play, she said, against specifying exactly what someone may be looking for.

It’s not impossible that casual romantic encounters might morph into friendships, Paul said, but for students “to look at these apps through just those friendships seems like a little bit of a stretch.” Also, Paul noted, it’s entirely possible that students weren’t entirely forthcoming with their answers.