While the UCMJ mirrors civilian law in many ways, there are some laws on the military books that are unique and somewhat bizarre. According to the manual, “Any person subject to this chapter who fights or promotes, or is concerned in or connives at fighting a duel, or who, having knowledge of a challenge sent or about to be sent, fails to report the fact promptly to the proper authority, shall be punished as a court-martial may direct.” Maximum punishment: Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and confinement for 1 year.

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Here’s a sampling of six of them: Sorry, all you potential Aaron Burrs. If you’re standing post and guarding a prisoner, you aren’t supposed to give him or her booze.

We thought this one was pretty weird, but the existence of such a law makes us think that someone, somewhere, must have actually done this one. Maximum punishment: Confinement for 3 months and forfeiture of two-thirds pay per month for 3 months. We’ve all heard the phrase “cuss like a sailor,” but that sailor can actually be busted for having a potty mouth.

Dishonorable discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and confinement for 2 years. Bad-conduct discharge; forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and confinement for 6 months.

If you accidentally fall off a ship, you won’t get in trouble.

Kansas had prohibition longer than any other state, from 1881 to 1948, and continued to prohibit bars selling liquor by the drink until 1987.

Both the 1948 amendment to the Kansas Constitution which ended prohibition and the 1986 amendment which allowed for open saloons provided that the amendments only would be in effect in counties which had approved the respective amendments, either during the election over the amendment itself or subsequently.

state details all of the counties and municipalities in the United States of America that ban the sale of alcoholic beverages.

33 states have laws which allow localities to prohibit the sale (and in some cases, consumption and possession) of liquor.

Of the 67 counties in Alabama, 25 are partially dry or "moist" (these counties contain cities that have voted to allow alcohol sales), and 42 are completely wet.

Clay County was the last county in the state to prohibit all alcohol sales countywide, but became partially wet on March 1, 2016, when two cities in the county voted to authorize alcohol sales.

Maximum punishment: Bad-conduct discharge, forfeiture of all pay and allowances, and confinement for 6 months.