That’s Not Cool addresses ways teens can work against dating abuse in their everyday actions.

The 11 facts you want are below, and the sources for the facts are at the very bottom of the page.

Teen dating violence — also called intimate relationship violence or intimate partner violence among adolescents or adolescent relationship abuse — includes physical, psychological or sexual abuse; harassment; or stalking of any person ages 12 to 18 in the context of a past or present romantic or consensual relationship.

National Center for Victims of Crime is the nation’s leading resource and advocacy organization for crime victims.

The Date Safe Project is committed to being the nation’s leading organization for teaching how “asking first” makes all the difference in creating safer intimacy and in decreasing occurrences of sexual assault.

“Of teenagers who are in abusive relationships, 3 percent will tell an authority figure, 6 percent will tell a family member, but 75 percent will tell a friend - that’s why we focus on kids,” former Middlesex County, Mass., District Attorney Gerry Leone tells “48 Hours”.

National Domestic Violence Hotline: 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) | 1-800-787-3224 [TTY] Love is Respect: 1-866-331-9474 | 1.866.331.8453 [TTY]RAINN: National Sexual Assault Hotline: 1-800-656-HOPE (4673)Love is Respect provides resources for teens, parents, friends and family, peer advocates, government officials, law enforcement officials and the general public. Breakthe engages, educates, and empowers youth to build lives and communities free from domestic and dating violence.

You want them to listen to your opinion, yet at the same time feel they are making up their own mind.

Welcome to Do Something.org, a global movement of 5.5 million young people making positive change, online and off!

It’s a time to test out which type of partners appeal to them, and how they can negotiate a romantic relationship.

But it can also be a confusing time and a difficult time for parents too. Gail Saltz, a psychiatrist with New York Presbyterian Hospital, has some advice. Your relationship with your partner is a model for how your teen will behave with others. Being manipulated, verbally put down, pushed or slapped and kept isolated from other relationships are all signs of an abusive relationship. Tell them they need to be honest and clear in communications. Make them think seriously about what sexual intimacy really means to them.

Social media has “added a level of stress that, we, as adults, haven’t had to deal with and we really need to make sure that young people understand that and set boundaries around their digital lives,” said Ferrer. Brittny Henderson of Burlington Wis., came face-to face with dating abuse her freshmen year in high school.