But as we went along I realized that it was actually a funny kind of therapy.

I told Joyce things that I hadn't told another living soul except my wife Kim.

We remember a vivid person, a remark, a sight that was unexpected, an occasion on which we felt something profoundly. We become more exalted in our memories than we actually were, or less so.

Yes, I'm mentioned here: Telling Their Life Stories, Older Adults Find Peace in Looking Back (Susan B.

Garland, Retiring, Your Money, NY Times, 12-9-16) Storytelling, so important in late life, may be facilitated in many ways, including Guided Autobiography classes (in which participants write stories to read aloud each week, on themes such as Money and Work), other forms of memoir writing workshops, telling one's story to a hired personal historian (to be captured in print, audio, or video), or participating in dignity therapy (as part of end-of-life treatment).

Its not only keeping the content, its keeping the feeling alive.

The best part is, youre not the only one remembering it." from neuroscientist Daniela Schiller's talk on "Keeping Memories Safe" (about Holocaust memories) on a Studio 360 radio program (NPR) featuring stories of neuroscience and memory If some copy here resembles Association of Personal Historians site copy, it's because I wrote copy for both, drawing on links here and on my two other websites: Writers and Editors and a site for the book Dying: A Book of Comfort. On the Aging Boomers Radio Show (Sonoma County), listen to personal historians Susan Milstein and Andi Reese Brady tell how they developed a business interviewing people about their lives and presenting them as audio CDs or beautiful bound books My Words Are Gonna Linger: The Art of Personal History ed.

I was honour-bound really to dig deep and bring memories, perhaps, that had been suppressed for a long time, that I would have preferred, perhaps, to remain in the sediment of my life.

But having done that and having got through this process, I now feel so much better. And I'm advising everyone I meet, all of my friends and everybody - people in the street, 'Write your own book.' Whether you publish it or not, it feels really good." ~ from Katie Couric's interview with the musician Sting, about his book Broken Music Ultimately, memoir writing is about giving a piece of oneself to history.I've really forgiven people in my life and forgiven myself. "This is the truest thing anyone can do," says Pat Lee, quoted in the story "Library helps memoirists tell their story" (Alex Parker, Chicago Tribune 10-16-09) I wanted it to sound natural, he said.Just like me a-settin and talking to someone just like it was in person.People do it all the time: they destroy papers; they leave instructions in their wills for letters to be burned." "Bell wrote in 2001, to announce that he had finished the first part of his archive, he said that the obsolescence of software and technology was a threat to a computer archive. I wrote an article called Dear Appy for applications.A lot of things you may not be able to read a decade later, he said. Basically, it was saying, Dear Appy, How committed are you? Data can be lost in a disk, in a system, it can be lost in a standard somewhere. If you look at all the problems that we can think about in the decade, ten, fifty, a hundred years, thats by far No. The one that bugs me more than anything else is that. " in The New Yorker"When Ken Schrader told me Herman's story would not be the one people would expect, I was intrigued. And by the time we finished he had made me realize that he is one of the most fascinating people to ever strap on a helmet.He added: It was a lot of remembering, and sometimes it took a while to remember what happened and how, but it got done. Stanley says he feels certain now, is that he never changed.