In Zoharic Kabbalah, God is represented by a system of ten sephirot emanations, each symbolizing a different attribute of God, comprising both male and female.

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Those who hold it to be a single poem point out that it has no internal signs of composite origins, and view the repetitions and similarities among its parts as evidence of unity.

Some claim to find a conscious artistic design underlying it, but there is no agreement among them on what this might be. The Song was accepted into the Jewish canon of scripture in the 2nd century CE, after a period of controversy in the 1st century.

The section closes with the woman telling the daughters of Jerusalem not to stir up love such as hers until it is ready.

The woman again addresses the daughters of Jerusalem, describing her fervent and ultimately successful search for her lover through the night-time streets of the city.

Beyond this, however, there appears to be little agreement: attempts to find a chiastic structure have not been compelling, and attempts to analyse it into units have used differing methods and arrived at differing results.

The poem proper begins with the woman's expression of desire for her lover and her self-description to the "daughters of Jerusalem": she insists on her blackness, likening it to the "tents of Kedar" (nomads) and the "curtains of Solomon".

He hastens to summon his beloved, saying that he is ravished by even a single glance.

The section becomes a "garden poem", in which he describes her as a "locked garden" (usually taken to mean that she is chaste).

The man describes his beloved: Her hair is like a flock of goats, her teeth like shorn ewes, and so on from face to breasts.

Place-names feature heavily: her neck is like the Tower of David, her smell like the scent of Lebanon.

[...] For all of eternity in its entirety is not as worthy as the day on which Song of Songs was given to Israel, for all the Writings are holy, but Song of Songs is the Holy of Holies." It is one of the overtly mystical Biblical texts for the Kabbalah, which gave esoteric interpretation on all the Hebrew Bible.