As more realistic humanoid robot design is technologically possible, they are also emerging in real-life robot design. Robotess is the oldest female-specific term, originating in 1921 from the same source as the term robot.A gynoid is anything that resembles or pertains to the female human form.Jack Halberstam writes that these gynoids inform the viewer that femaleness does not indicate naturalness, and their exaggerated femininity and sexuality is used in a similar way to the title character's exaggerated masculinity, lampooning stereotypes.

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Probably most famous, however, is Pygmalion, one of the earliest conceptualizations of constructions similar to gynoids in literary history, from Ovid's account of Pygmalion.

In this myth a female statue is sculpted that is so beautiful that the creator falls in love with it, and after praying to Venus, the goddess takes pity on him and converts the statue into a real woman, Galatea, with whom Pygmalion has children.

The 1964 TV series My Living Doll features a robot, portrayed by Julie Newmar, who is similarly described.

More recently, the 2015 science-fiction film Ex Machina featured a genius inventor experimenting with gynoids in an effort to create the perfect companion.

In science fiction, female-appearing robots are often produced for use as domestic servants and sexual slaves, as seen in the film Westworld, Paul J.

Mc Auley's novel Fairyland (1995), and Lester del Rey's short story "Helen O'Loy" (1938), Examples include Hephaestus in the Iliad who created female servants of metal, and Ilmarinen in the Kalevala who created an artificial wife.

In a parody of the fembots from The Bionic Woman, attractive, blonde fembots in alluring baby-doll nightgowns were used as a lure for the fictional agent Austin Powers in the movie Austin Powers: International Man of Mystery.

The film's sequels had cameo appearances of characters revealed as fembots.

A gynoid (or fembot) is a humanoid robot that is gendered feminine.

Gynoids appear widely in science fiction film and art.

The husbands' technological method of obtaining this "perfect wife" is through the murder of their human wives and replacement with gynoid substitutes that are compliant and housework obsessed, resulting in a "picture-postcard" perfect suburban society.