Originally established in 2003 by founder Markus Frind, he managed to gain ten million users while running the site from his bedroom.

Today the dating site is available in five different languages reportedly have an impressive 55,000 new sign-ups a day.

The idea is presumably to safeguard people from searching for their own spouses on the site - though how a husband would explain to his errant wife how he came to stumble across her picture on a website for adulterers, I don't know.

In order to fit in with the general ethos of the website I have invented a wife.

From then on, it is up to the users whether they would like to chat more or even meet in person.

There have been several cases where people have used Plenty of Fish to meet people in order to carry out criminal acts.

They are allowed to sign up for free as a way of ensuring the numbers are balanced between the sexes.

I register, and enter the murky world of two-timing technology, taking note of the warning on the site: "Not all affairs have a positive effect on a marriage." What a masterpiece of understatement.

Reading it on my laptop in the aptly named Cafe Affaire in central London, I consider what she really wants: a no-strings-attached sexual relationship.

What I don't know is how her husband will feel about it. Aside from the little matter of her marital status, she also believes I have a wife, but she doesn't care.

She wants instant gratification even though we've exchanged only a few words online.