Aside from working in the movies as cinematographer and/or editor, Abaya also works as still photographer for commercial lay-outs and directs commercials for television. He studied at the University of the Philippines (UP) School of Fine Arts. Abelardo, brother to cinematographer Bayani Abelardo, and uncle to Ben Resella, art director of Sampaguita Pictures who later became a scenic artist in Hollywood.He was documentary photographer for the Department of Public Information in 1974 and stillman for the American produciton Hit Woman in 1976. He married Maria Saret, who is also a movie director.

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In May 1985, the Actors Workshop became a private foundation and opened its doors also to nonprofessional actors and other acting enthusiasts.

Its founders were noted actors and directors from the film industry, including Johnny Delgado, Laurice Guillen, Peque Gallaga, Leo Martinez, Ishmael Bernal, Rudy Fernandez, Amy Austria, Vivian Velez, Rowell Santiago, Mario Taguiwalo, and Ricardo Puno Jr.

, but it is a special cash card; you can get this card only abroad — in selected BDO accredited remittance companies.

There are numerous BDO Remit offices, partners and agents worldwide, particularly in countries where there are a lot of OFWs.

Abaya has won awards both for his work in film editing and cinematography. He was educated at San Miguel Elementary School in Bulacan and Manila High School.

Among his award-winning works as director of photography are: Karnal (Carnal), 1983, Urian and Metro Manila Film Festival (MMFF) awards; Pahiram ng Isang Umaga (Lend Me One Morning), 1989, with Eduardo Jacinto and Nonong Rasca, Urian and Star Awards; and Misis Mo, Misis Ko (Your Wife, My Wife), 1989, Star Awards. Abelardo went to the United States to train as scenic artist in early Hollywood films, such as Footlight Parade, 1933, and Charlie Chaplin’s Modern Times, 1936. Abaya and Catalina Roxas, he is married to movie director Marilou Diaz-Abaya with whom he has two children.His partners in this venture were his wife and two high school buddies, film assistant director Gregg de Guzman and sound director Amang Sanchez.As film editor, he won the Urian award for Brutal, 1980, with co- editor Mark Tarnate. In local movies, he pioneered the art of cinematographic wizardry. His parents are Rafael Accion and Filomena Bautista.His other movies that received nominations in the best- cinematography category are: Tanikala and Working Girls, Urian; Brutal, Moral, and Desire, MMFF; The Graduates, Pinulot Ka Lang sa Lupa (You Were Merely Plucked From the Earth), and Nagbabagang Luha (Blazing Tears), Film Academy of the Philippines (FAP) Awards; and Hari sa Hari, Lahi sa Lahi (King to King, Race to Race), Star Awards. To him have been attributed such awesome and wondrous cinematic effects as human princes turning into figures of stone and vice versa in Ibong Adarna (Adarna Bird), 1941; the fantastic floating castle in Prinsesang Basahan (The Princess in Rags), 1949; the biblical Red Sea parting at the stroke of a cane in Tungkod ni Moises (Moses’ Cane), 1952; handsome Jaime de la Rosa transformed into a horrifying bat creature in Taong Paniki (Bat Man), 1952; Bayani Casimiro dancing upside down from ceiling-to-wall-to-floor in Big Shot, 1956; and the terrifying giant reptile monster sowing havoc in Tuko Sa Madre Kakaw (Gecko at Madre Cacao), 1959. Francisco aka Botong Francisco for the production design of some films that he directed, among them: Haring Kobra (King Cobra), 1951, where a mythical Balinese country near the Philippines was created; and Higit sa Korona (Above the Crown), 1956, where the illusion of ancient Egypt provided the backdrop for the longest swordfight in local movie history. He finished high school at the University of Manila.At one time, AWF produced a 30-minute daily TV drama called Wakasan which served as a practicum for workshop participants. She became the most popular child star of the decade of the 1950s, sharing top billing with major stars, such as Pancho Magalona and Lillian Leonardo in Anghel ng Pag-ibig (Angel of Love), 1951; Gloria Romero in Rebecca and Ramon Revilla and Sylvia La Torre in Ulila ng Bataan (The Orphans of Bataan), 1952; Katy de la Cruz and Norma Vales in Cumbanchera, 1953; and Fred Montilla in Nagkita si Kerubin at si Tulisang Pugot (Cherubim Meets Headless Bandit), 1954. Aguirre made her screen debut in Sampaguita Pictures ’ Himagsikan ng mga Puso (Revolt of the Hearts), 1938, which was based on the novel by Julian Cruz Balmaseda, Tala ng Bodabil (Star of Vaudeville). During the 1950s she was an exclusive contract star of LVN Pictures for mother roles in films like Pag-asa (Hope), 1951; Tia Loleng (Aunt Loleng), Tenyente Carlos Blanco (Lieutenant Carlos Blanco), and Matador (Bullfighter), 1952; and Tumbalik na Daigdig (Topsy-Turvy World) and Sa Paanan ng Bundok (At the Foot of the Mountain), 1953. She is the eldest child of Bernardino Alatiit of Roxas City and Angelica Liguid of Cavite. After high school, she took a one-year course on tourism and travel at the Centro Escolar University.