Interestingly, more than 15% of adults say that they have used either mobile dating apps or an online dating site at least once in the past.

online dating sites statistics 2016-47

More and more of us insist on outsourcing our love-lives to spreadsheets and algorithms.

According to the Pew Research Center, the overwhelming majority of Americans suggest that online dating is a good way to meet people.

While dishonesty was slightly less prevalent among the British sample, 44% did admit to lying in their online profile.

In both the US and UK samples, dishonesty declined with age.

Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and conventional wisdom both suggest that love is a fundamental human need. A survey conducted in 2013 found that 77% of people considered it “very important” to have their smartphones with them at all times.

Most people meet their significant others through their social circles or work/school functions. In the search for a potential date, more and more people are switching to less traditional methods. With the rise and rise of apps like Tinder (and the various copycat models) who could blame them.

According to research conducted at Michigan State University, relationships that start out online are 28% more likely to break down in their first year, than relationships where the couples first met face-to-face. Couples who met online are nearly 3 times as likely to get divorced as couples that met face-to-face. While the overwhelming majority of romantic relationships still begin offline, around 5% of Americans that are currently in either a committed relationship or marriage, suggest that they did in fact meet their significant other online.

It’s very easy to send one course back (or even one after another, after another, after another) when the menu is overflowing with other potential courses.

Of course there are pitfalls and tripwires in every sphere of life, but this may be particularly true in the context of online dating.