The term ‘halfbreed‘ still got tossed around a lot when I was growing up and was pretty ubiquitous in my parent’s and grandparent’s time.

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My understanding of my Métis identity has shifted considerably over the years.

You see, I was only about 5 years old when the term Métis was recognised officially in section 35(2) of the Constitution Act of 1982.

Names like L’Hirondelle, Loyer, Callihoo (spelled a million different ways), Belcourt…those were a dead give away that someone was related to me somehow.

But aside from the odd family story that didn’t interest me as a child (but fascinate me now as an adult), I knew very little about our regional history.

Following this through, you could imagine emerging Métis communities, not just historical ones.

You mean, what is the definition I use for myself and thus present as the definition all others must live by?In another post, I talked about Pan-Indianism, and also Pan-Métisism.What this post and those previous two have in common, is that they are about identity.There are also discussion about connection to culture as a métis, so it is not always focused on blood. Big ‘M’ Métis tends to be an socio-political definition, referring to the blend of First Nations and European cultures resulting in the genesis of a new identity.However, the cultural connection referred to is generally First Nations culture, not a distinct métis culture. There is less focus on “race”, although kinship ties are very much present.My blogger name reflects that history, as âpihtawikosisân literally means ‘half-son’ in Cree.