Prosecuting took a lot of time and money and was generally a thankless task.

Maybe you live in a strato-klepto-kakocracy run by warlords who can’t even pronounce “jurisprudence”, let alone enforce it.

Maybe you’re a despised minority group whom the State wants nothing to do with, or who wants nothing to do with the State.

The exotic anarcho-capitalist part comes in as English civil society creates its own structures to work around these limitations.

Merchants, landowners, and other people with wealth banded together in mutual-protection-insurance-groups.

Everyone in the group would pay a fixed amount yearly, and if one of them got robbed the group would use the money to hire a prosecutor to try the criminal.

Group members would publish their names in the newspaper to help inform thieves whom it was a bad idea to rob.

Somali judges compete on the free market; those who give bad verdicts get a reputation that drives away future customers. Legal Systems Very Different From Ours, by anarcho-capitalist/legal scholar/medieval history buff David Friedman, successfully combines the author’s three special interests into a whirlwind tour of exotic law. Crime victims have little economic incentive to punish the perpetrator; if you burn my house down, jailing you won’t un-burn the house.

“Anarcho-capitalism” evokes a dystopian cyberpunk future. If you steal my gold, I have some interest in catching you and taking it back, but no more than I do in catching some other poor shmuck and taking his gold.

living scattered in foreign countries have generally wanted to run their own communities by their own rules.