Proven to be popular, the design was patented by Nintendo.It later earned a Technology & Engineering Emmy Award.In 1980, Nintendo launched Game & Watch—a handheld video game series developed by Yokoi.

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He found that the biggest playing card company in the world was using only a small office.

Yamauchi's realization that the playing card business had limited potential was a turning point. However, Nintendo was forced to sell it because problems with the labour unions were making it too expensive to run the service.

He then acquired the license to use Disney characters on playing cards to drive sales. The company then began to experiment in other areas of business using newly injected capital during the period of time between 19. It also set up a love hotel chain, a TV network, a food company (selling instant rice) and several other ventures.

In 1963, Yamauchi renamed Nintendo Playing Card Co. In 1966, Nintendo moved into the Japanese toy industry with the Ultra Hand, an extendable arm developed by its maintenance engineer Gunpei Yokoi in his free time.

Following some success, Nintendo developed several more light gun machines (such as the light gun shooter game Wild Gunman) for the emerging arcade scene.

While the Laser Clay Shooting System ranges had to be shut down following excessive costs, Nintendo had found a new market.

He worked for Yokoi, and one of his first tasks was to design the casing for several of the Color TV-Game consoles.

Miyamoto went on to create, direct and produce some of Nintendo's most famous video games and become one of the most recognizable figures in the video game industry. Nintendo had some small success with this venture, but the release of Donkey Kong in 1981, designed by Miyamoto, changed Nintendo's fortunes dramatically.

Based on a 16-bit processor, Nintendo boasted significantly superior hardware specifications of graphics, sound, and game speed over the original 8-bit Famicom.

The system was also said to have backwards compatibility with Famicom games, though this feature was ultimately cut upon release.

The success of the game and many licensing opportunities (such as ports on the Atari 2600, Intellivision and Coleco Vision) gave Nintendo a huge boost in profit and in addition, the game also introduced an early iteration of Mario, then known in Japan as Jumpman, the eventual company mascot.