My friend had a heart condition plus various cancers that kept coming back. When you go through so much sorrow you know that it makes no sense to be mean or cruel to the people around you. An awful secret had been served at the table and I was the only one not feasting on the dish. He had been fired from AOL in some sort of scandal, and the company we had worked together at back in 1999 had gone bankrupt. Finally, though, it occurred to all of my friends that I was the only one at the table who didn’t know he was dead. Instead someone gave me a URL and I went to it later and it was a tribute page to my friend.

“The term itself is stupid, and the campaign and petition written by men’s rights activists claiming that men need to take up more space due to their anatomy, and that anti-manspreading campaigns are ‘male-bashing,’ are ridiculous. If I was putting someone ‘before anything else,’ I would respect them enough to use their name.” — S. Also, the concept ‘before anybody else,’ developed AFTER the word became popular. “I’d rather be called ‘babe’ than ‘bae’ any day.” — Alexsis Outwater, Bronson, Mich. — Dawn Farrell, Kanata, Ont., Canada “Enough with the over-sensationalized words to describe weather! Prescott, Oshawa, Ont., Canada “I think most, if not all can agree that we would prefer to avoid the polar vortex in the future, both in name and in embodiment.” — Christine Brace, Westminster, Md. Louis Post-Dispatch editorializes about a ‘political vortex.'” “Suddenly things that once would have been called ‘tips’ are now being called ‘hacks.’ It can’t be because the one word is shorter or easier to say; and the actual accepted meanings of ‘hack’ have nothing to do with suggestions for doing tasks better or more efficiently — quite the opposite, really.” – Sharla Hulsey, Sac City, Iowa. What they really mean is ‘tip’ or ‘short cut,’ but clearly it is not a ‘hack,’ as it involves no legal or ethical impropriety or breach of security.” – Peter P. There are probably even hacking hacks.” – Chellsea Mastroine, Canton, Ohio. We already have a perfectly good word in ‘skills’ (ending with an s, not a z).” – Chip Lupo, Columbia, S. I’m kind of a sleepie.'” – Andy Poe, Marquette, Mich.

The problem is with people taking up too much space on the subway or any public mode of transportation. “Life hack, this hack, that hack…stop with the hacks! “I crave good sleep, too, but that does not make me a sleepie. Sounds like ‘foodie’ is a synonym for ‘everybody.’ Foodies around the world agree; let’s banish this term.” – Steve Szilagyi, Mason, Mich.

So the word that received the most nominations this year was already banished, but today it is being used differently than it was in 1999, when nominators were saying, “I am SO down with this list! “Currently, it is being overused as the first word in the answer to ANY question. It has replaced ‘discussion,’ ‘debate,’ ‘chat,’ ‘discourse,’ ‘argument,’ ‘lecture,’ ‘talk’…of which can provide some context to the nature of the communication. “Anything that the speaker finds vaguely inconvenient or undesirable, such as an opposing political belief or bad traffic.

For instance, “How did you learn to play the piano? Perhaps the users feel that it is a word that is least likely to offend people, but I consider it to be imprecise language that, over time, dumbs down the art of effective discourse.” – Richard Fry, Marathon, Ont. Contrast things that are self-evidently taken to be problematic with, say, actual problems like a hole in the ozone layer or a job loss.” – Adam Rosen, Asheville, N. “Often used with ‘engagement.’ If someone is disengaged, they’re not really a stakeholder in the first place.

We thought it might rival “fiscal cliff,” the most-nominated phrase on the 2013 list, but it didn’t come close.

Cal of Cherry Hill, NJ wonders, “Are there intellectual creditors? You take the girl out to two or three dinners, you wine and dine. He just wanted to have sex with a different beautiful woman every night." Dan said, “But after his last bonus, he left the city and moved to California. I think he’s doing nothing, just living off that last bonus.” I was trying to figure out how big his bonus was that he could just live off of it forever like that. But its hard to go from wanting to die to suddenly being cheered up. I just wanted the death of these various emotions that were hurting me not just emotionally but physically. This way, for 0 I can have sex with some of the most beautiful girls on the planet and then that’s it, move on to the next one.’" "But then he would miss the emotional stuff." "He didn't care about that. When you get that feeling ask yourself, "What is it inside of me that really wants to die? But when I look back on it, never did I really want my heart to stop beating. 1171, which says, “Although the ‘price point’ of effective new drugs…may initially be out of reach for many patients…” “It has no ‘point.’ It is just a ‘price.’” – Guy Michael, Cherry Hill, N. “Usually used in a sentence explaining the ‘secret’ in excruciating public detail. “Whether it’s a ‘free gift’ (banished in 1988) or droopy clothing, this word is neither useful nor fancy.” – Jeff Drake, Saint Albans, West Va.Is this a metaphor for business success based on the fast food industry? “It has become too frequent in business discussions. “An annoying bit of hyperbole about the latest saucy picture or controversy that is already becoming trite.” – Tim Bednall, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia “Meaning a post or video or whatever will have so much Internet traffic that it will ‘break the internet.’ It’s being used for every headline and video. “I hope the list doesn’t ‘break the internet.’ (How else would I read it next year)? “It seems as if every politician who makes a statement has to ‘walk it back,’ meaning retract the statement, or explain it in laborious detail to the extent that the statement no longer has any validity or meaning once it has been ‘walked back.’” – Max Hill, Killeen, Tex. Kenneth Ross of Glastonbury, Conn., and Bob Priddy of Jefferson City, Mo., were among many who saw this storming in last January. “The word has become so overused that it is not ‘swag’ to not use the word ‘swag.'” – Devin, Farwell, Mich.” Answer: “So my dad was in a classical music club…” – Bob Forrest, Tempe Ariz. The word serves no purpose in the sentence and to me is like fingernails on a chalkboard. LSSU, please engage your stakeholders by adding this pretentious jargon to your list. Harley Carter of Calgary, Alberta, says he has heard it with another word popular in business-speak, “socialize,” which means to spread an idea around to see what others think of it.