Online matchmaking services like e Harmony and are designed for those who are serious about dating.

Instead, members take a personality test upon signing up with the service, and their answers are entered into a matching algorithm to calculate compatibility with potential partners.

e Harmony has a reported 33 million members worldwide and even has its own lab, where psychologists question and observe couples and use the results to continuously refine the matching algorithm.

“People don’t want to bring science into love,” says Dr Tamara Brown of Gene Partner, a DNA analysis service that helps people find their perfect match.

“This is not really love, it’s sex.” For $99, Gene Partner will test your DNA, sequencing key genes and examining those in your major histocompatibility complex (MHC).

Our busy modern lives make it hard to meet new people, so more and more of us are turning to technology to find that special someone.

Once the last resort for lonely hearts, online dating has become socially acceptable, even widespread – 4.7 million British people visited a dating site during 2008.

These are genes which produce proteins that sit on the surface of cells so that the immune system can identify foreign invaders.

These results can then be used either to check compatibility with your current partner, or to help you find a suitable mate by taking the data to one of several dating services (both on and offline) that offer a ‘DNA dating’ service.

Users download the app and register for the free service, create a profile with their lifestyle and interests, and provide the same information about their ideal partner.