It’s important to remember that though dating should not be used for the purpose of bringing the person you’re dating to know Jesus, it’s still a chance to encourage and uplift those we come into contact with.

Healthy interactions with others will leave us with little regrets, no matter what the long-term outcomes.

Type the word “dating” into your Bible search tool and what comes up? When I was single, I remember wishing there was an entire book—or even just a chapter—of the Bible dedicated to the topic of dating.

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Dating with wisdom means we also understand the importance of emotional and spiritual boundaries by learning not to go too deep, too fast.

God’s word tells us to guard our hearts, because the truth is, everything valuable is worth protecting.

In biblical times, the process of meeting a spouse had very little to do with compatibility and personality traits, and everything to do with family lineage and economic status.

Finding a mate functioned a lot more like a bartering system than dinner and a movie.

It’s easy to include God in our spiritual lives, but why not include Him in our relational world, as well?

Throughout God’s Word, He encourages us again and again to bring our needs, concerns and desires to Him (Matthew 7:7).All over Scripture, we are reminded of the value of a physical relationship within the context of a committed marriage and the risks of intimacy outside of marriage (Hebrews 13:4, Song of Solomon 8:4).Dating well means we make sure to honor and respect this portion of our future marriage by setting physical limits and boundaries when it comes to interacting with the opposite sex.It’s time to take the pressure off of trying to date “biblically” and instead see the entirety of our interactions with others (including how we date) as an opportunity to connect with God, to become our best and reflect Him to the people He brings into our lives.Because there is truly nothing more “biblical” than that.The first six chapters are the history section, telling of a Jew named Daniel of royal descent, who was taken captive along with the rest of the people from the city of Jerusalem.