She decided that "chemistry occurred most often between people who are down-to-earth and sincere".This is because "if a person is comfortable with themselves, they are better able to express their true self to the world, which makes it easier to get to know them..if perspectives on important matters differed." Sharing similarities is also deemed essential to chemistry as "feeling understood is essential to forming relational bonds." The various manifestations of chemistry are: sexual chemistry, romantic chemistry, emotional chemistry, activity chemistry, team performance chemistry, creative chemistry, intellectual chemistry, and empowerment chemistry".Example: Peter and Marcia are settling down and buying a house together. Three weeks after our grandmother died, our grandfather died of a broken heart 3.

While the actual definition of chemistry, its components, and its manifestations are fairly vague, this is a well documented concept.

Some people describe chemistry in metaphorical terms, such as "like cookie dough and vanilla ice cream", or "like a performance".

It can be described in the terms of mutual feelings - "a connection, a bond or common feeling between two people", or as a chemical process - "[it] stimulates love or sexual attraction...brain chemicals are definitely involved".

While chemistry has been described as "that romantic spark between [two people]", the term "spark" in the context of relationships is as vague as "chemistry", and therefore is not particularly useful in a definition. D., suggests that "not everyone experiences chemistry".

Comprehensive learning resources, advice, reviews, and links for people interested in Chinese can be found on our Chinese Language Resources for Travelers and Students page.

调情 (tiáoqíng): to flirt 泡妞 (pàoniū): to pick up girls; to flirt with, hit on, or hook up with girls 辣妹 (làmèi): hot chick; sexy girl (literally, “spicy little sister”) 帅哥 (shuàigē): hunk; handsome guy (often used to address a man in a flattering way) 倍儿棒 (bèir bàng): northern Chinese slang for “really awesome”; one common use of this expression is to describe someone’s body 花瓶 (huāpíng): a beautiful person who is not intelligent, capable, or talented; eye candy (literally, “flower vase”) 绣花枕头 (xiùhuā zhěntou): synonym for 花瓶; someone (or something) beautiful but useless (literally, “embroidered pillow”) 撒娇 (sǎjiāo): [of females] to act like a spoiled child, speaking in the voice of a little girl, whining, pouting, acting clingy and dependent; such behavior on the part of a woman to her boyfriend or husband is considered charming in Chinese culture 女人小坏,男人疼爱 (nǚrén xiǎohuài, nánrén téng’ài): “If a woman behaves mischievously (more literally, “is a little bit bad” or “does little bad things”), a man will love her dearly.” 老牛吃嫩草 (lǎoniú chī nèncǎo): a relationship between two people with a large age gap (literally, “old cow eating tender grass”) 装嫩 (zhuāng nèn): to “pretend to be tender”; to act, speak, and/or dress much younger than one’s actual age 花 (huā): an adjective used to describe a player; horny, womanizing 花心 (huāxīn): to be fickle in love; to have a tendency to be unfaithful 花花公子 (huāhuā gōngzi): playboy; “player,” often one who dresses up like a dandy (literally, “flower prince”) 麦芽糖女人 (màiyátáng nǚrén): clingy, possessive woman (literally, “malt sugar woman,” as malt sugar is sticky) 约会 (yuēhuì): to have a date [with someone]; to make an appointment [with someone]; also, a date or appointment (noun) 网恋 (wǎngliàn): Internet dating AA制 (AA zhì): “going Dutch”; each person paying his or her share (often used as just “AA” in sentences, e.g.

Here is another collection of Mandarin slang expressions—some of the more commonly used expressions I’ve come across in chatting with and listening to native speakers, and in books like Eveline Chao’s .

For more Chinese slang expressions, read my previous post, Contemporary Chinese Slang Part 1.

There are various psychological, physical and emotional symptoms of having good chemistry with another person.