“When I moved in here, I’d been through my divorce and a breakup,” she says, returning from the bathroom and referring to the ten or so months she spent dating Chris Evans, best known as Captain America, and her much more famous co-star in an upcoming film about a family struggling with a young girl’s genius affinity for math. They’d said really adorable things about each other on Anna Faris’s podcast. That or “Jewish Felicity,” taking over Manhattan, like in the TV show. But not Her mother, a ceramicist, and father, a lauded poet, are still married; she wrote a book about her childhood home in Massachusetts with her dad this year.

“The stress that I saw him be put under, I’ve never seen that before, and he handled that really gracefully,” she says.

What she wasn’t taking into account was that he’s used to it. “I was the person that was stressed.” She’s also aware in hindsight that she hadn’t processed her separation before she got together with Evans.

Not to mention that she and Evans met while playing love interests in a movie that is now coming out and that she needs to promote. I want to find my own seat at the main dinner table, because I want to do this forever, and I want to show that it doesn’t always have to be a bikini model opposite Captain America.’ ” Evans and Slate met at her chemistry read — the audition in which it’s determined whether two romantic leads play well together — and they instantly got along.

“I remember him saying to me, ‘You’re going to be one of my closest friends.’ I was just like, ‘Man, I fucking hope this isn’t a lie, because I’m going to be devastated if this guy isn’t my friend.’ ” The first time they went out to dinner, as co-workers getting to know each other, she remembers insisting they split the bill over Evans’s strenuous objections.

“He’s really vulnerable, and he’s really straightforward. He has beautiful, big, strong emotions, and he’s really sure of them. His heart is probably golden-colored, if you could paint it.” think I’m beautiful, but if you’ve had a certain lifestyle and I’m a very, very different type of person — I don’t want to be an experiment.” Evans never made her feel that way, but it was hard to get past how so many people seemed to feel some ownership of him and view her as an interloper. But yes, he’s so hot.’ ” Every time Slate mentions Evans, it keeps coming back to the same thing: As much as they loved being with one another, she says, “we’re really, really different,” with different social circles and different lifestyles.

“If you are a woman who really cares about her freedom, her rights, her sense of being an individual, it is confusing to go out with one of the most objectified people in the entire world,” she says. Slate comes from a DIY comedy scene, and most of her friends are fellow comics and gay guys. “For him to go to a restaurant is totally different than for me to go.That is really, really sad.” Throughout all of it, the divorce, the new love, she says, “I just didn’t have the tools.And I didn’t think very hard about that, to be honest. Chris is a sunny, loving, really fun person, and I didn’t really understand why I should be prudent.” Are she and Evans on good terms?Current favorites include a children’s book with Barbara Cooney illustrations that she bought on Etsy and loves so much she put it on display so she could see it when she wakes up. She’d fought hard for her part in as a teacher who falls for Evans’s character, a working-class guy trying to give his prodigy niece (Mckenna Grace) a normal childhood.“It’s about an old woman who doesn’t love how she’s alone, and then learns to make herself not alone through art, and draws people into her life through art. Slate’s part is not huge, but it’s a big studio picture.“If you take away my preferences, you take away my freedom,” she says she told him.