So what was the most commonly cited reason for using Tinder?It's popular: 48.3% of the respondents indicated that the main reason they used Tinder revolved around its popularity — the media hype or the fact that many of their peers were using it.

That's because instead of going on one blah date, you've gone on 27.

Ultimately, there's absolutely no guarantee you'll meet someone online.

"For people who want to whine and moan about how online dating isn't working," says psychologist Eli Finkel, "go back in time to 1975.

Ask somebody, 'What does it feel like to not have any realistic possibility of meeting somebody that you could potentially go on a date with? Finkel is a psychologist at Northwestern University and a professor at the Kellogg School of Management; he's also the author of "The All-or-Nothing Marriage." Finkel and his colleagues have been studying online dating for years.

Thus, users can quickly view hundreds of local singles and decide with a quick swipe of their finger if they’re interested or not.

In the popular media, Tinder very much has the reputation of being a "hookup" app, designed to facilitate fleeting sexual encounters.

Their current conclusion is that the matching algorithms so many companies claim to use to find your soul mate don't work.

The biggest benefit of online dating, Finkel told Business Insider, is that it introduces you to tons (and tons) of people.

Only about 5% of those surveyed indicated that the desire for hookups was their main motivation for joining the site. The participants were also asked what they thought the purpose Tinder was.

When it came to people’s perceptions, not surprisingly, they were true to stereotype.

Actually, the mathematical model they used did a job of predicting attraction than simply taking the average attraction between two students in the experiment.