Without the ability to date archaeological sites and specific contexts within them, archaeologists would be unable to study cultural change and continuity over time.

If we knew the precise length of reign for every Egyptian king, chronology would be no problem.

However, we do not even know the number of kings for all periods, and there is also the possibility that reigns overlapped by coregency or in times of political disunity.

The dating of remains is essential in archaeology, in order to place finds in correct relation to one another, and to understand what was present in the experience of any human being at a given time and place.

Inscribed objects sometimes bear an explicit date, or preserve the name of a dated individual. However, only a small number of objects are datable by inscriptions, and there are many specific problems with Egyptian chronology, so that even inscribed objects are rarely datable in absolute terms.

For example, the results of dendrochronology (tree-ring) analysis may tell us that a particular roof beam was from a tree chopped down in A. For example, the stratum, or layer, in which an artifact is found in an ancient structure may make it clear that the artifact was deposited sometime after people stopped living in the structure but before the roof collapsed.

However, the stratigraphic position alone cannot tell us the exact date.There are two general categories of methods for dating in archaeology.One is Relative Dating, and the other is Absolute Dating.Typological dating may foster the tendency to assume that each step in development is of about the same time length, but this does not need to be the case in reality.All living organic materials contain Carbon-14 atoms in a constant number.C-14 dates are often published as dates 'before present' (the 'present' was fixed for analytical reasons at a single point, and the year AD 1950 was chosen for this) with the indication of the inaccuracy.